35 Design Jokes That Will Make You Laugh

Have you ever had one of those bad days when it seems that everything is crashing around you? Fatigue, stress, nerves, tight deadlines or a difficult client often makes us want to escape. Regardless of the jobs we have, we are all human and we need from time to time a bit of relaxation to change our mood. This is where design jokes come along. It not only helps us overcome the difficult moments but also reload our batteries and focus on the projects we have to do. There are many ways to get ahead of the difficult moments: some of us listen to music, others do sports, others go for a walk, or others just dream eyes open J. But I think the simplest and easiest way to change our mood (or not even get into the dark and cold cave of the bad mood) is, well, to laugh.
😄

As the saying goes, a day without laughter is a day wasted! And well, once again, we all need a good laugh to break up the ho-hum and the stress of everyday life.

Cheer up with these 35 funny design jokes that will definitely make you laugh! I selected some really funny jokes turned into images, cartoons, memes, photos, posters, drawings and many other funny images. All of them are about subjects such as Photoshop, designer school, designer work, freelancing, fonts, clients, icons, creative process, and so on!

Check them out and enjoy!

Designers vs regular people

Some people say the graphic designers are extremely complicated human beings. Let’s take a look at this real proof of how they perceive the colors.

Photoshop always works

I don’t know what’s in the mind of this patient, but for sure, he would like the surgeon to be as good as the graphic designer.

Gotcha!

That delightful moment when you get the invoice from your web designer :). Some pills against heart attack, please!

Why Photoshop is more powerful than Sketch

It could be a good thing if the designer knows what he is doing. And it seems is for free, so… I would expect a lot of people to park there :).

What’s your ideal client?

You know the life of a graphic designer is pretty hard, but… you can keep dreaming, right?

How to piss the Rock

Relax, this is almost the regular conversation between a graphic designer and his client, especially when the last one doesn’t know what’s all about!

Thanks to the Courier, we have different fonts

Sometimes, the regular people ask themselves why we love so much to be a graphic designer….. conferring character to the fonts is just one of the reasons.

How web designers ask for help

Maybe you should think better if you have the crazy idea of web designer from drowning. Unless you are not a web designer also, God knows what you could understand!

The difference between doctors and web designers

Thankfully, the doctors are not treated like web designers. Otherwise, we would have just designers and no doctors :).

What’s missing here?

Life isn’t always #000000 and #FFFFFF…. even if we would want this. Does someone see the missing of the gray area?

Comic Sans walks into a bar….

Even if the characters have a modern twist here….. does someone see the picture of a classic western?

Font guide

I might be taught, but I just hope you’ll never follow this guide when you’ll choose the font for your next design project.

The Little Mermaid

If the Little Mermaid would have been a font…. Probably she would have looked like this. Fortunately, she’s just a character of Hans Christian Andersen’s imagination and a beautiful story. Let’s stay to the origins. 🙂

Corporate graphic design guide

Maybe you know this process… Maybe you experience this process… But don’t be sad, you are not alone :(.

Did you know?????

….. the most regular people don’t have any idea what’s going on if you speak Klingon with them? Please repeat it in English! Please….

How people see the design

Do you see the process here? Wow! This is actually happening! Don’t tell me I haven’t warned you!

Self-discipline according to web designers

I know the web designers could be the hardest workers on the planet, but…. Do you need a time management app? An efficient one?

There are always two sides of a coin

 

The most important part is to find the balance between both of them…. Can you see the picture???

The many emotions of a programmer

Like all of us, the programmers are also people. They live their emotions like all people. So, do not wonder why their invoices are so big. Just see what happens to them after they complete a project…

When a client says “We love your style”……

…. You could expect something like this. Don’t tell me I haven’t warned you! Just 1 question: do you think it could be better NOT to like your style???

Starting another side project

Just remember to keep the track of them, even if this could be a daunting task. In the end, you don’t want your projects to look like a war field, do you?

This is the eternal question….

For civilians, it’s a matter of imagination…. But…. does the equation make sense to you? Maybe someone can explain it to us, novices :).

Sex and design

From time to time, we should go back to the basics and listen to the advice of the wisest ones than us. This is one of those situations…..

Don’t use that tone with me!

The designers always say the colors have a voice and express a message. But….. can you imagine a real conversation between them? This could be an option :).

Make the logo bigger

….. But, please keep it in your mind that it should fit somewhere….. on print…. or in some different screen sizes….

Can you turn this around…

…. so, we can see more of the front? Again, a very-often heard question…. This is happening when the clients don’t know Photoshop is a design software, not a cloning or a 3D printing one :).

The designer has many faces…

… I’m sure you know this. Just pick how many you want and tell us which are yours :).

The creative process

You shouldn’t believe what you hear: the creative process is nice, smooth and you have time for everything. Rather, it looks like here :).

The real life of a graphic designer

Never, but never…. do not take into account what your friends think you do. It might be a huge difference.

Every designer in this world knows this

I’m sure you have been there with at least one of your client. But here’s the tip: save just the last two files and maybe you’ll not suffer anymore.

This is how they did it

Back to the origins…. Does someone remember how to do some handcraft work?

We are designers, not tools

This is a global message for clients around the world who think the designers are just some tools ready to execute their weird and ugly ideas. We don’t have any problems with the screwdrivers.

The Unforgiven

And now? What’s next? Or even better: what’s the reward?

The best endorser

Sometimes, a barter could be a smart choice. Especially when your client is Santa Clause. 🙂

Why we call it italic

This is what italic looks like in real life. Does anyone have any doubt?

Let us know which one of these designer jokes you liked most. Do you know more jokes? Don’t be shy – let us know in the comments!

Read More at 35 Design Jokes That Will Make You Laugh

from Web Design Ledger https://webdesignledger.com/35-design-jokes-will-make-you-laugh/

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The Ideal Cover Photo Size for Each of the Major Social Media Platforms

One of the first few things people see when they visit your social media profiles is your cover photo.

Whether it’s your Facebook Page, LinkedIn Company Page, or YouTube channel, your cover photo is the biggest image on the page. And people will see your cover photo even before they see any of your posts.

So how do you make your cover photo show up the exact way you want it to be?

One of the key factors is the size. Without the correct dimensions (width and height), your cover photo might be cropped to fit the space available and people will miss the important details on your photo.

While there isn’t a one-size-fits-all cover photo size for all the social media platforms, the information is out there.

We’ve collected all the answers here so that you can have a single point of reference for all cover photo sizes.

The Ideal Cover Photo Size for Each of the Major Social Media Platforms

The best cover photo size for all major social media platform

Some social media platforms display cover photos slightly different on the desktop and on mobile. But in general, here are the ideal cover photo sizes for the platforms with a cover photo.

(Feel free to click on a social media platform to see more details for that particular platform.)

Facebook – 820px x 462px (Profile, Page, and Group), 820px by 465px (Page video), 1920px by 1080px (Event)

LinkedIn – 1584px x 396px (Profile), 1536px x 768px (Company Page)

YouTube – 2560px x 1440px

Twitter – 1,500px x 500px

Google+ – 1600px x 900px (Profile and Page), 368px x 207px (Collection and community)

Tumblr – 1600px x 900px

If you spot an error or an outdated information, I’m be grateful if you could let me know in the comments section below. Thanks!

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Ideal cover photo size for Facebook

Facebook profile cover photo – 820px x 462px

Facebook profile cover photo

The ideal size for your Facebook (personal) profile cover photo is 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall. According to Facebook, your cover photo has to be at least 720 pixels wide.

There are four important details to take note of when creating a cover photo for your Facebook profile:

1. Your cover photo will look slightly different on mobile. 

On mobile, Facebook shows your cover photo at a different dimension — slightly taller or narrower. Facebook will either show more of your image if your image is tall enough or crop the sides away.

From my tests, 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall is an ideal size for both desktop and mobile. Facebook will show the blue section on the desktop and both the green and blue sections on mobile.

Facebook cover photo template

You can grab a Photoshop file of this template here.

2. You can reposition your cover photo on the desktop.

In case you have any important details at the top or bottom of your cover photo and you worry that Facebook will crop them away on the desktop, Facebook allows you to reposition your cover photo by dragging it up or down.

Drag Facebook profile cover photo

3. Your profile photo, your name, and a few buttons overlay your cover photo.

As you might have noticed in the example above, several things overlay the cover photo. You might want to take this into consideration when choosing or creating your cover photo. On mobile, your profile photo will overlay your cover photo in the middle.

Facebook profile cover photo on mobile

A good rule-of-thumb is to avoid having any important details in the lower half of your cover photo that might be hidden behind your profile photo.

4. Facebook shows only about half of your cover photo when someone lands on your profile.

When someone navigates to your Facebook profile, Facebook would not show your entire cover photo immediately. She or he has to scroll up a little to see the full image.

Facebook profile cover photo

To encourage people to scroll up and check out your full cover photo, you might want to have something attractive enough in the bottom-half of your cover photo.

Facebook Page cover photo – 820px x 462px

Facebook Page cover photo

We have a post that goes into more detail about the Facebook Page cover photo. Here are some of the key points:

1. Unlike your profile cover photo, nothing overlays your Facebook Page cover photo.

This is great because you don’t have to worry about anything blocking important details on your cover photo.

2. Like your profile cover photo, your Facebook Page cover photo will look slightly different on mobile. 

According to Facebook, your Facebook Page cover photo displays at 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall on desktops and 640 pixels wide by 360 pixels tall on mobile.

From my tests, I found that it’s best to use an image that is 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall and to have what you want to show up on the desktop within a 820-pixels wide-by-312-pixels tall box (or the blue section).

Facebook cover photo on desktop and mobile

You can grab a template of the ideal Facebook Page cover photo here.

3. Use a PNG file for better resolution.

According to Facebook, if your cover photo has your logo or text, your logo or text might show up better when you use a PNG file.

Facebook Page cover video – 820px by 465px

Buffer Facebook cover video

Yes! You can use a video for your cover photo. Isn’t that amazing?

Here are the recommendations by Facebook for your Facebook Page cover video:

  • Your video should be at least 820 pixels wide by 312 pixels tall. For best results, upload a cover video that’s 820 pixels wide and 456 pixels tall.
  • Your video should be between 20 and 90 seconds.

As for the video file format, I believe MP4 or MOV is recommended; though any of the formats on this list should work, too.

Facebook Group cover photo – 820px x 462px

Facebook Group cover photo

The Facebook Group cover photo is almost identical to the Facebook Page cover photo — just a little shorter.

The ideal cover photo size is 820 pixels wide by 462 pixels tall (similar to the Facebook Page cover photo). But the area visible on the desktop is 820 pixels wide by 250 pixels tall (slightly shorter than the Facebook Page cover photo). Your photo has to be at least 400 pixels wide and 150 pixels tall, according to Facebook.

Feel free to grab a template of the ideal Facebook Group cover photo here.

One thing to bear in mind is that while nothing overlays your Facebook Group cover photo on the desktop, your Facebook Group name will overlay your cover photo on mobile.

Facebook Group cover photo on mobile

Another thing you might want to think about is how your cover photo shows up in the Groups section of the Facebook mobile app.

Facebook Groups on mobile app

According to Marie Page, it’s best to have your copy in the center of your cover photo for the copy to show up nicely.

Facebook event photo – 1920px by 1080px

Facebook event photo

The recommended size for the event photo, according to Facebook, is 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels tall (a 16:9 aspect ratio).

For a public event, anyone who views the event can see the event photo. For a private event, only people who are invited to the event can see the event photo.

 

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Ideal cover photo size for LinkedIn

LinkedIn profile background photo – 1584px x 396px

LinkedIn background photo

1. The ideal aspect ratio is 4:1.

Your LinkedIn profile background photo is displayed at a 4:1 aspect ratio. LinkedIn recommends using photos that are 1584 pixels wide and 396 pixels tall.

If your background photo looks blurry after uploading, LinkedIn has some suggestions for you:

If your background image appears blurry or pixelated, please choose an image with a file size as close to the maximum as possible [8MB], as images with larger file sizes typically look better. Photos will also look better than images with logos. If your image is still blurry or pixelated, you may want to run it through a compression tool such as Trimage for Windows or ImageOptim for Mac before uploading it to LinkedIn.

2. LinkedIn will crop your background photo on mobile.

In its mobile app, LinkedIn will crop away the sides of your background photo, as seen in the screenshot below.

LinkedIn profile background photo on mobile

LinkedIn Company Page cover photo – 1536px x 768px

LinkedIn Company Page background photo

1. LinkedIn will crop your cover photo on the desktop.

While LinkedIn recommends the dimensions of 1536 pixels wide by 768 pixels tall, it seems to crop away the top and bottom of the photo on the desktop, as seen in the screenshot above.

So it might be best to keep the important aspects of your photo to the middle of the photo if possible.

(The minimum dimensions required by LinkedIn is 1192 pixels tall by 220 pixels wide.)

2. LinkedIn will show a bigger cover photo on mobile.

The reason LinkedIn recommends those dimensions might be because it displays a bigger cover photo in the mobile app.

LinkedIn Company Page background photo on mobile

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Ideal channel art size for YouTube

2560px x 1440px

YouTube channel art

1. Your channel art looks differently on the desktop, mobile, and TV.

The cover photo for your YouTube channel is known as the channel art.

Because YouTube can be viewed on a desktop, mobile, and even TV, your channel art will be displayed differently on different devices. The ideal dimensions that YouTube recommends are 2560 pixels wide by 1440 pixels tall.

Here are a few more details to take note of:

  • Minimum dimension for upload: 2048 x 1152 px.
  • Minimum safe area for text and logos: 1546 x 423 px. Larger images may get cropped on certain views or devices.
  • Maximum width: 2560 x 423 px. This means that the “safe area” is always visible regardless of screen size. The areas to each side of the channel art are visible or cropped depending on browser size.
  • File size: 4MB or smaller.

YouTube has created an awesome channel art template that you can use to see how your channel art will look like on various devices.

YouTube channel art template

The template comes in a Photoshop file and a Fireworks file so you can overlay it on your image to get a sense of how your image will be cropped and displayed. Here’s an example that Ash created previously:

YouTube channel art template example

2. Be mindful of your profile image and channel links.

When you are creating your channel art, you might want to avoid having any important details in the upper-left and lower-right corners of your channel art.

That’s because your profile image and channel links will be placed on top of your channel art when viewed on the desktop and mobile.

Here’s how your channel art will look like on the desktop and mobile with your profile image:

YouTube channel art overlay

YouTube channel art overlay on mobile

For tips on optimizing your YouTube channel, you might like our guide on creating a YouTube channel.

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Ideal header photo size for Twitter

1500px x 500px

Twitter header photo

Twitter recommends that your header photo be 1500 pixels wide by 500 pixels tall — much wider than it is tall, compared to most cover photos.

It’ll be great to use an image that is wide enough to prevent Twitter from stretching the image and making it blurry.

1. Your profile photo overlays your header photo.

Just like your Facebook profile, your Twitter profile photo will cover a tiny part of your header photo. It’s great to be mindful of this so that your profile photo doesn’t cover anything important in your header photo.

2. Twitter allows you to reposition and scale your image.

Something nice about Twitter’s header photo is that Twitter allows you to reposition and scale the photo you uploaded to your liking.

Twitter header photo adjustments

3. Your header photo is slightly bigger on mobile.

On mobile, Twitter seems to show a little more of your photo on the top and bottom if it is tall enough. (Notice how you can see my shoes in the mobile header photo but not in the desktop header photo.)

Twitter header photo on mobile

If your header photo is 500 pixels tall (or shorter), Twitter might scale your photo up and crop a little of the sides away.

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Ideal cover photo size for Google+

Google+ profile and page cover photo – 1600px x 900px

Google+ cover photo

Google+ cover photos seem to be displayed at 1084 pixels wide and 610 pixels tall, which is very close to the aspect ratio of 16:9. To ensure that your cover photo looks clear on your profile, it might be best to use an image that is 1600 pixels wide and 900 pixels tall.

1. Keep the important details in the middle of the cover photo.

Here’s something amazing about Google+ cover photos: they are responsive. Your cover photo will automatically crop as you scroll down the page so that the middle of the cover photo will always be in focus.

Google+ cover photo scroll

2. Google+ lets you crop your image according to its recommended dimensions.

When you upload your cover photo, Google+ allows you to edit the crop of the image if it doesn’t fit the aspect ratio of 16:9.

Google+ cover photo adjustments

3. Your cover photo looks and behaves the same on mobile.

On mobile, the cover photo seems to appear at the same aspect ratio (16:9) without any crop. It also automatically crops as you scroll down.

Google+ cover photo on mobile

Google+ collection and community cover photo – 368px x 207px

Google+ collection and community cover photo

For Google+ collections and communities, your cover photo will show up as a small image in the upper-left corner, at 368 pixels wide by 207 pixels tall (which is a 16:9 aspect ratio again).

On mobile, your cover photo will show up with the same aspect ratio without any crop.

Google+ collection and community cover photo on mobile

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Ideal header image size for Tumblr

1600px x 900px

Tumblr header image

1. Most people won’t see your Tumblr header image.

Tumblr is an interesting case: Unless you are using the official Tumblr blog theme, people will only see your header image when they view your blog within Tumblr itself — when your blog shows up in their search result (screenshot above) or when they hover over your profile image (screenshot below).

Tumblr dashboard popover

According to Morgana Johnson, Tumblr will display your header image at various sizes on the desktop and on mobile with a fixed aspect ratio of 16:9.

2. There might not be an ideal size.

If you are using the official Tumblr blog theme, there might not be an ideal size for your header image. I noticed that the size of the header image and the crop change as I change the size of the browser.

Tumblr header image sizes

From my tests, it seems best to use an image with an aspect ratio of 16:9 that has the important information in the middle of the image.

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Over to you

I hope you found this resource useful for creating the perfect cover photo for your social media profiles.

Do you have any tips and tricks for creating cover photos? It’ll be great to hear from you in the comments section below!

Finally, I would love to keep this resource updated. If you spot any outdated information (or mistakes), would you be up for letting me know in the comments section below, too? Thank you!

Image credit: UnsplashMark Zuckerberg’s Facebook profile, TED YouTube channelThe Late Late Show with James Corden YouTube Channel, Social Media Examiner Google+ Page, Our Universe Google+ collection, Tumblr

from Social https://blog.bufferapp.com/ideal-cover-photo-size

The infamous Brexit Bus is now being used to promote a fintech startup


Remember the Brexit Bus? During the fraught campaigning surrounding the UK’s referendum on its EU-membership, the Vote Leave campaign hired a bus, and plastered on it the words “We send the EU £350 million a week. Let’s fund our NHS instead.” They didn’t realize it at the time, but this would come to symbolize the fact-free nature of the Leave campaign. For starters, there was no £350 million; when you subtract the UK’s rebate, the real figure is much lower. And courtesy of higher costs following the post-Brexit drop in the pound, and the troubling matter of the “divorce bill,”…

This story continues at The Next Web

from UK – The Next Web https://thenextweb.com/money/2017/09/25/the-infamous-brexit-bus-is-now-being-used-to-promote-a-fintech-startup/

Dear Engineering Students, Here’s How you Land Your Next Engineering Job 

The Telecom Industry is a fast progressive field, where the Graduates, especially Engineers can work with fast-evolving technology. The Telecommunications Engineers are the experts, who actually are from Electrical and Electronics department and specialize in various technologies related to telecommunications.

With the Mobile technology progressing at unprecedented speed, the need of engineers for carrying out various jobs is also on the rise. Getting accustomed to the technology and the specialized in certain field areas like Networks and broadband is the need of today.It’s the high time when you must know how to find jobs in the telecom industry and how the latest technology is helping the job seekers in their search for jobs.

In this article, we will focus on how to land your next engineering job:

 

Getting an entry into the telecom industry

A few years back, there was a scenario, when getting into the telecom industry was a little complicated as compared today. Today, with the advent of new technologies and with the evolution of several platforms, offering the jobs, especially in the field of telecom, the hard task of getting entry has become easy.

Requirements variation

The entry requirement varies Pan India, depending upon the entry levels, positions & experience and the company you are applying in. You must remember that the work experience is useful, but also never an essential requirement.

 

Trends of telecom industry

The trend of the telecom industry is fast changing. As the technology is fast progressing, the big trend in the Information technology, which is the virtualization as highly seen in cloud computing is the face of change.

The engineers are getting hired in bulk numbers for the purpose. The hiring is now, being done either through recruitment drive, through job portals or direct application to the company.

 

Changing face of Telecom

The working in telecoms has also gained a new face in the past few years. The role, which was largely based as the field engineer, has turned more into office based. There are now even possibilities of traveling abroad and also you can work at home.

Now, the mobility is usually not a requirement. The focus of the telecom has changed since the installation of the towers to the teamwork, designing and developing new products, testing of those products and setting up infrastructure and supporting and satisfying customers. Also, we have seen that over the years, this sector has grown itself to the recession-proof.

 

Finding jobs in telecom sector

The hard task of finding jobs in the telecom sector is now an easy one. Now, with the availability of several job portals, recruitment drives, several social media platforms, online notifications of jobs have become the favor the country among the pass out engineers.

Lending jobs in the sector have become too easy, with several companies eager to provide the required training to the candidates seeking the telecom jobs. There is no dearth of the platform in the form of Linkedin, Field Engineer etc., which are paving the quick and easy way for the engineers to get a job in the Telecom sector.

Short term skill training in specific job roles is the way to meet the demand at any point in time. With the resources of the company gaining an expansion, they are not afraid to bridge the gap between the skills required by the company and already posed skills of the candidates.

 

Field Engineer – A trendsetter in Telecom sector

Field Engineer is an online resource for connecting field engineers and the businesses/companies, which hire them has unleashed a new era in the field of telecom. Providing a powerful platform for businesses and the job seekers, the company is involved in the process of interviewing, vetting, hiring and paying and thus offers a platform, indispensable to the field of the telecom industry.

Offering a revolutionary platform meant just for the telecom industry, Field Engineer has revolutionized the telecom world by providing the works to the work seekers for the telecom field engineers, who are constantly, looking to gain experience work wise and connect with the business all over the world.

With the focus of the company to connect the engineers and telecoms every day, it does not matter where you are in the world. You can be anywhere and still can remain connected. With Field Engineer, you can easily handle the remote jobs with much ease through the robust and easy to use platform

Field Engineer – A Platform for all

With the company focusing on the telecom engineers, the platform is great especially for Technicians, Network Engineers and Architects, Project Engineers, Security Engineers, Voice Engineers, Wireless Engineers, Data Center Engineers and VMware Engineers.

With the availability of the Field Engineer at apps, both at IOS and Android, the company offers a completely flexible approach towards the better connection of the field engineers and the companies involved in the business. Fairly straightforward platform and easy to use, along with the secure payment services, the employees, and employers, both are benefiting from such an initiative, one of a kind in the world.

The Field Engineer is focused on providing a well-built platform to the technical talents to go ahead in the future and have a direct access to the work. With the rising digital aspects, the company is focused on providing the best platform to tap into the best talents from all around the world and make this world, a really small place to work, where talents meet the destination, it should be.

As telecom veterans, the company is focused on harnessing the best talents and providing them a platform, where they can showcase the skills and talents & can earn a handsome salary for themselves and can connect with the companies of the world and thus can expand their wings.

Thus, providing the streamlined platform, the Field Engineer is, in fact, a revolutionary step in the telecom industry and can inspire towards a better future ahead in the telecommunications industry!

Read More at Dear Engineering Students, Here’s How you Land Your Next Engineering Job 

from Web Design Ledger https://webdesignledger.com/dear-engineering-students-heres-how-you-land-your-next-engineering-job/

Breaking: Uber loses its license to operate in London


London’s transport authority, Transport for London (TfL), has said it will not renew Uber’s license to operate in the city, which expires September 30. In a statement shared on its official Twitter account, TfL said that “Uber London Limited is not fit and proper to hold a private hire operator license,” saying that its “approach and conduct demonstrate a lack of corporate responsibility in relation to a number of issues.” TfL has today informed Uber that it will not be issued with a private hire operator licence. pic.twitter.com/nlYD0ny2qo — Transport for London (@TfL) September 22, 2017 TfL mentioned Uber’s approach…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Uber

from UK – The Next Web https://thenextweb.com/uk/2017/09/22/breaking-uber-loses-license-operate-london/

Top Prototyping Tools And The Importance Of Prototyping In Your Workflow

Did you ever try to work in a straight line from the beginning to the end of a design project? If yes, you may have discovered that your design concept didn’t work out quite as planned. Perhaps, it didn’t even work out at all.

Prototyping is an effective way to prevent such occurrences from happening. Any extra work involved in building a prototype usually pays good dividends!

Prototyping significantly speeds up the design process. Moreover, it helps spot errors that would involve greater expense during later stages.

Finding the right prototyping tool need not take a lot of your time. The three featured here, are the best of the best.

Proto.io

Both low- and high-fidelity prototypes serve useful purposes. Whether you want verification that your design concept is valid and workable, or you wish to user test your design before handing it over to a developer, Proto.io will be a great choice. It is a powerful and easy-to-use prototyping tool.

You can start using it right away, since design or coding skills are not required to use it.Once you add Proto.io to your toolkit, you’ll be able to do your design and prototyping work, share information, provide previews, and collaborate with project stockholders – all on a single platform.

Proto.io’s Dashboard helps you maintain strict version control and supports your collaboration tasks. The Editor provides the functionality needed to build your prototype(s). The Playerplays an essential role when you need to share a prototype with others, conduct testing, or view change results on your browser.

You have the option of designing a prototype from scratch using the Editor, or importing design and design information from Photoshop or Sketch.

Design Systems by UXPin

If you’re in the market for an end-to-end UX design tool, UXPin is your best bet. The market is saturated with prototyping tools, but UXPin seems to be the only tool that doesn’t just excel at prototyping, but also tackles the more complex challenges of workflow, design consistency, and developer collaboration.

This cloud-based platform supports the whole UX process in one place: design systems, prototyping, documentation, collaboration, and developer handoffs. UXPin also integrates with Photoshop, Sketch, Jira, and Slack to create a more connected workflow.

One simplified workflow we found useful was creating your design system in UXPin with Sketch assets, then quickly prototyping in UXPin, collecting feedback in UXPin and sharing in Jira, then generating specs and style guides for developers in UXPin.

Fluid UI

Fluid UI is a user-friendly wireframing and prototyping tool designed to improve communication between web designers, developers and product managers.

Without ever leaving the platform, you can design, start interactive video sessions and chat and comment in real time whether designing or just previewing. Fluid UI is especially effective when working with distributed teams – whether in the same office, or on the other side of the planet, it doesn’t matter.

Fluid UI also contains a comprehensive series of built-in libraries that support wireframe and prototype design, material design, and design on iOS or the web. You can also upload your existing designs.

Three subscription plans are available, but you might first want to see what Fluid UI has to offer by signing up for its single project, “Free Forever” plan. Unlike other tools, Fluid UI also has the advantage of allowing you to store your data for free between projects.

Why Prototyping is so Important

To ensure you’ll accomplish your goals, it’s important to test your ideas as you progress. This is much more preferable than work straight through.

Prototypes provide insight into the performance of a site’s functionality. They tell you when changes are needed to ensure the product will be a pleasure to use.

Prototypes help you:

  1. Define your design goals and ideas, refine them, and allow them to evolve

How to get the maximum benefit from prototypes? You need to create a series of them to check your design as you progress.

This process is often referred to as rapid prototyping. Such approach will help you deliver a high-quality design in less time.

  1. Determine what works, what doesn’t, and what could be made to work better

A cool idea doesn’t always magically morph into a stellar design. If you’re going to make a pitch to a client, it’s not a bad idea to first see if your design idea is practical and feasible. Low-fidelity prototypes are particularly effective in demonstrating the practicality of a design concept.

Once practicality established, further prototyping can be extremely useful. Use it to validate and improve your design’s performance characteristics and functionality!

  1. Identify easy to overlook design errors or problems

You don’t have to wait until user testing to uncover any remaining problems. Doing so can cost you extra in terms of time and money.

Problems detected early on are generally easiest to fix. By using prototypes, you’re more apt to detect problems that would otherwise go unnoticed.

  1. Collaborate and communicate more effectively

Prototypes, especially interactive ones, contain vastly more valuable information than text or slideshows.

Prototyping can reduce a day-long product review meeting to an hour or less in many instances. This is also relevant when communication tools like video or live chat are put into play.

Summary

A prototype can be viewed simply as a useful design aide, but a good prototyping tool offers much more. It does not only speed up the design process! It provides an excellent means for early-on detection of hard-to-find design errors.

Those chosen here, stand for the best of the best in terms of functionality and performance.

Read More at Top Prototyping Tools And The Importance Of Prototyping In Your Workflow

from Web Design Ledger https://webdesignledger.com/top-prototyping-tools-and-the-importance-of-prototyping-in-your-workflow/

How to Create a Social Media Marketing Strategy From Scratch

This post originally published on July 16, 2014. We’ve updated it here with new research and stats and a cool new infographic. 🙂

When I went rock climbing for the first time, I had no idea what I was doing. My friends and I were complete newbies about ropes and rappelling and every other bit of jargon and technique that goes with climbing. We saw others doing it spectacularly well. We were thrilled at the thought of reaching the top of the climbing wall; we had no idea how to get there.

I’d imagine that a social media marketing strategy could feel the same way.

If you’re starting from square one, it might feel equal parts thrilling and overwhelming. You know what you want to do and why. You can see that others have climbed the social media mountain; you’ve got few ideas how to get there yourself.

It’d help to have a plan.

We’ve shared before about different parts of a social media strategy—the data and research and personal experience behind what works on social media.

Now we’re pleased to put it all into a cohesive, step-by-step blueprint that you can use to get started. If you need a social media marketing plan, start here.

Social media marketing plan infographic

Social Media Marketing Plan

Starting at the ground floor and building up, here is our overview of how to create a social media marketing plan from scratch.

I like to think of this plan like a road trip. Start out by pointing yourself in the right direction, then choose the way you’re going to get there, check in regularly to make sure you’re on track, and have some fun along the way.

Step 1: Choose your social networks

Step 2: Fill out your profiles completely

Step 3: Find your voice and tone

Step 4: Pick your posting strategy

Step 5: Analyze and test

Step 6: Automate and engage

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Step 1: Which social media sites you should use

Step 1: Choose your social networks

Social media is as homogenous from network to network as soda pop is from brand to brand. Sure, it’s all social media, but Google+ and Twitter might as well be Mountain Dew and Pepsi. Each network is unique, with its own best practices, own style, and own audience.

You should choose the social networks that best fit your strategy and the goals you want to achieve on social media.

You don’t have to be on them all—just the ones that matter to you and your audience.

Some things to consider that can help you choose not only which social networks to try but also how many to try.

Audience – Where do your potential customers hang out? Which social network has the right demographics?

Time – How much time can you devote to a social network? Plan on at least an hour per day per social network, at least at the start. (Once you get going, tools like Buffer can help you save a bit of time.)

Resources – What personnel and skills do you have to work with? Social networks like Facebook emphasize quality content. Visual social networks like Pinterest and Instagram require images and videos. Do you have the resources to create what’s needed?

For the first part of this decision, you can reference the audience research and demographics from surveys like those conducted by Pew Research. For instance, Pew has complete data, collected last year, of the demographics for Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Here is a side-by-side comparison of the major social media platforms’ user demographics.

Social media platform demographics

For Snapchat’s user demographics, you can check out this “Who’s on Snapchat, anyway?” blog post by Snapchat.

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Step 2: Fill out your profiles completely

Step 2: Fill out profiles completely

One of our monthly checks here at Buffer is to visit each of our social media profiles and make sure that our profile photos, cover photos, bio, and profile info are up-to-date and complete. It’s a key part to our social media audit. A completed profile shows professionalism, cohesive branding, and a signal to visitors that you’re serious about engaging.

Profiles will require two parts: visuals and text.

For visuals, we aim for consistency and familiarity with the visuals we use on social media. Our profile photo on Instagram matches our profile photo on Facebook. Our cover photo on Twitter is similar to our cover on LinkedIn.

To create these images, you can consult a social media image size chart that will show you the exact breakdown of dimensions for each photo on each network. For an even easier time of it, you can use a tool like Crello or Canva, which comes with prebuilt templates that set the proper sizes for you.

Crello cover photo options

For text, your main area to customize is the bio/info section. Creating a professional social media bio can be broken down into six simple rules.

  1. Show, don’t tell: “What have I done” often works better than “Who I am”
  2. Tailor your keywords to your audience
  3. Keep language fresh; avoid buzzwords
  4. Answer the question of your potential followers: “What’s in it for me?”
  5. Be personal and personable
  6. Revisit often

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Step 3: Find your marketing voice and tone

Step 3: Find your voice and tone

The temptation at this point might be to jump right in and start sharing. Just one more step before you do. Your foray into social media will be more focused and more on point if you come up with a voice and tone for your content right off the bat.

To do so, you could spend time coming up with marketing personas and debating the finer points of your mission statement and customer base. These are all well and good. But for a social media marketing plan just getting off the ground, you can make this process a bit easier.

Start with questions like these:

  • If your brand was a person, what kind of personality would it have?
  • If your brand was a person, what’s their relationship to the consumer? (a coach, friend, teacher, dad, etc)
  • Describe in adjectives what your company’s personality is not.
  • Are there any companies that have a similar personality to yours? Why are they similar?
  • How do you want your customers to think about your company?

At the end of this exercise, you should end up with a handful of adjectives that describe the voice and tone of your marketing. Consider this to keep you on track:

Voice is the mission statement; tone is the implementation of that mission.

MailChimp has created a standalone website simply for its voice and tone. Here’s an example of how they implement these qualities into their communication:

MailChimp voice and tone

Cultivate a voice that delights your customers, then your customers will be thrilled to spread the love about you.

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Step 4: Pick your posting strategy

Step 4: Pick your posting strategy

What’s the ideal amount to post per day? How often should you post? When should you post? What should you post? The solid gold, ironclad answer for questions like these is:

It depends.

So much of the social media experience is about your individual audience and niche. What works for you might not work for me, and you never know until you try (we’ll get to trying in step five).

That being said, there is some pretty good data and insight about where to start. Here’s what we’ve found to be good jumping off points.

What should you be posting?

Videos are ideal for engagement.

The push toward video content has plenty of anecdotal evidence—as you browse your Facebook News Feed and Twitter timeline, you’re likely to see videos all over. There’s data to back up this trend: Videos posts get more views, shares, and Likes than any other type of post. And it’s not even close.

On Facebook, video posts get higher average engagement than link posts or image posts, according to BuzzSumo who analyzed 68 million Facebook posts.

What should you be posting?

On Twitter, videos are six times more likely to be retweeted than photos and three times more likely to be retweeted than GIFs, according to Twitter.

If you want to get started on creating social videos, here’s our video marketing guide on creating epic content on Facebook, Twitter, and more.

The 4:1 Strategy

Now that you know what works, you can place these different types of updates into a consistent strategy. One of my favorite systems is the one used by Buffer’s co-founder Joel Gascoigne. It works like this:

  1. Start with the basic six types of updates we all post: Links, videos, images, quotes, reshares, plain-text updates
  2. Choose a “staple” update, a single type that will make up the majority of your shares
  3. Create a 4:1 ratio of sharing: for every four “staple” updates, publish one different type for variety

This way your followers know what to expect from you, and you can hone your sharing to a specific type, making it easier to perfect and to experiment.

(Note: You might not want to post the exact same updates across each of your social networks. Consider composing your updates in a unique way to complement each network’s own best practices, culture, and language.)

How often should you be posting?

There’s been a lot of interesting data out there about how often to post to social media. Some of the factors that might impact your specific sharing frequency may include your industry, your reach, your resources, and the quality of your updates. The social network you’re using will have its own best practices, too.

If people love your updates, you can typically always get away with posting more.

For a specific number, here’re some guidelines we’ve put together based on some really helpful research into how often to post to social media.

  • Facebook – Once or twice per day
  • Instagram – Once or twice per day
  • Instagram Stories – Eight to 16 Stories, twice per week
  • Twitter – Three to ten times per day
  • LinkedIn – Once or twice per day
  • Pinterest – Five to ten times per day
  • Snapchat – Five to 20 times per week

How often should you be posting?

When should you be posting?

There are many neat tools to show you the best time of day to post to Facebook, Twitter, and more. These tools look at your followers and your history of posts to see when your audience is online and when historically have been your best times to share.

So what’s someone to do who’s just starting out on these social networks, with no audience and no history?

Again, this is where best practices come in. Perhaps the most helpful (and adorable) infographic I’ve seen about timing comes from SumAll, which compiled timing research from sites like Visual.ly, Search Engine Watch, and Social Media Today to create its awesome visual. Here’s an overview of what they found in terms of timing (all times are Eastern Time).

  • Twitter – 1-3pm weekdays
  • Facebook – 1-4pm and 2-5pm weekdays
  • LinkedIn – 7-8:30am and 5-6pm Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
  • Tumblr – 7-10pm weekdays and 4pm on Fridays
  • Instagram – 5-6pm weekdays and 8pm on Mondays with a sweet spot at 6pm
  • Pinterest – 2-4pm and 8-11pm weekdays with weekends being the best
  • Google+ – 9-11am weekdays

Social media posting times

I would recommend experimenting with these times (in your local time) and a few randomly-picked times as you’re starting out.

Once you have been posting a while, you can use your own data and tools like Facebook Insights, Instagram Insights, and Followerwonk to find your brand’s best time to post and refine your posting strategy.

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Step 5: Analyze, test, and iterate

Step 5: Analyze and test

Remember how we talked about social media sharing being a very individual, specific endeavor? Your stats will likely start to bear this out.

The more you post, the more you’ll discover which content, timing, and frequency is right for you.

How will you know? It’s best to get a social media analytics tool. Most major social networks will have basic analytics built into the site; it’s just a little easier to seek and find this information from an all-encompassing dashboard.

These tools (I’ll use Buffer’s analytics as an example) can show you a breakdown of how each post performed in the important areas of views, clicks, shares, Likes, and comments.

Top post in Buffer

Which social media stats are best? We’ve gained some insight from looking at each of these main statistics and the composite engagement statistic on a per-post basis. The resulting stat gives us a great look, over time, of how our social media content tends to perform, and we can then test and iterate from there.

Here’s one way to analyze your performance.

Set a benchmark. After two weeks or a month of sharing, you can go back through your stats and find the average number of clicks, shares, likes, and comments per post. This’ll be your benchmark going forward. You can come back and update this number at any time as your following and influence grow.

Test something new. We’re open to testing just about anything at Buffer. We’re in the midst of some tests right now on our Facebook account. Do Facebook Live videos get more views than non-live videos? Does the video length matter? We’ll often hear about someone’s new strategy or get a new idea and then test right away.

Did it work? Check the stats from your test versus the stats of your benchmark. If your test performed well, then you can implement the changes into your regular strategy. And once your test is over, test something new!

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Step 6: Automate, engage, and listen

The final piece of a social media marketing plan involves having a system you can follow to help you stay on top of updates and engage with your community.

To start with, automate posting of your social media content.

Tools like Buffer allow you to create all the content that you want to, all at once, and then place everything into a queue to be sent out according to whatever schedule you choose. Automation is the secret weapon for consistently excellent sharing, day after day.

Your plan doesn’t end with automation, though. Social media requires engagement, too.

When people talk to you, talk back. Set aside time during your day to follow up with conversations that are happening on social media. These are conversations with potential customers, references, friends, and colleagues. They’re too important to ignore.

One way to stay up on all the conversations that are happening around you and your company is to create a system for listening and engaging. Tools like Buffer Reply and Mention will collect all social media mentions and comments on your posts in a single place, where you can quickly reply your followers.

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What would you share with someone new to social media?

Coming up with a social media marketing plan is a great step toward diving in to social. If social media looks thrilling and overwhelming all at once, start with a plan. Once you see the blueprint in front of you, it’s a little easier to see what lies ahead.

  1. Pick your networks
  2. Fill out your info
  3. Find your voice
  4. Choose your strategy
  5. Analyze and test
  6. Automate and engage

Bingo!

How did you develop your social media strategy? I’d love to keep the conversation going in the comments. If you know someone who could use this, feel free to pass this along. If you can use it yourself, let me know how it goes!

Want more social media tips? Take our free email course!

I’ve put together a list of 25 practical social media strategies that work for us here at Buffer—and I’d love to share them with you via email.

Join here

This post originally published on July 16, 2014. We’ve updated it with new research, statistics, and a cool new infographic on September 2017. 🙂

Image sources: Will Scullin, MailChimpCrelloSumAll, and Pew Research

from Social https://blog.bufferapp.com/social-media-marketing-plan

Top 20 inspiring examples of ultra-minimalist websites

Despite the minimalism being present in almost every form of art and the concept of minimalism has been quite around for centuries, it became a specific form of art in the 20th century. Starting then, like vintage or retro design, it has never in or out of a trend – it was just there, regardless of time.

In simple words, the minimalism is defined as eliminating all the unnecessary elements and retain just the fundamental, in order to allow the content pop. The “less is more” philosophy is a well-loved style of design among web designers, who are increasingly appreciating it.  Even if the minimalism offers the websites that embrace it many advantages, maybe the most important are faster loading times, a better compatibility between the different screen sizes, the clean and beautiful visuals and the efficiency in conveying the message to the audience. Moreover, a simple UI design is attuned to mobile browsing, without harming the desktop experience.

In terms of design, the minimalist aesthetic is the visual representation of this concept. Even if in the early days of this style it was very difficult for the designers to achieve its simplicity and clean lines, they have learned to “declutter” the visual to the point of it being the second nature. However, some of the designers take it a step further and cut out almost everything from the design.

Indeed, even if the latest web designs with loud color, trendy headers, and stunning imagery are really attractive, sometimes, it’s nice to see and admire the everlasting minimalist style. The ultra-minimalist websites in this list focus on composition and typography to create clean and simple visuals, and the naked designs are as beautiful as those full of glamour.

Rubrasonic

The website uses changing dark backgrounds that harm the eyes a little bit. Otherwise, the extreme simplicity defines the whole design. For the home page, the white centered logo shows some music-related quotes, such as: “I call architecture frozen music” (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe), “After silence, that which comes closest to expressing the inexpressible is music” (Aldous Huxley) and so on. The navigation menu is represented by the white dots on the left of the screen and hovering the mouse over them brings up the category title.

Leen Heyne

Besides its jewelry, Leen Heyne’s monochrome logo and company name are the only significant visual elements on its homepage. The surrounding expanse of gray space and white texts make it a safe bet, the user’s eyes going back and forth between the two core visual elements.

Wmat.it

Here is an extremely minimalist homepage design. Most of the elements on this page do something – the letters are the navigation menu and show the categories on mouse over. The solid black square shows some video clips when you hover the mouse over it. The only element that does nothing is the circle.

Wildflower

Seeing this page, it’s no wonder that this joyful little website is ultra-minimalist as there really isn’t much content throughout! The home page has black text on a white background, the only accent of color being the pink heart in the text. The next page is similar, just asking you for your name and the name of the person you want to give a flower to, then you get your flower, which you can change if you wish.

Hunkwot

This site uses the ultra-minimalist concept in a very beautiful way. The home page has a very pale gray background with thin, hardly-visible white lines separating the categories that are displayed in black text across the page. When you hover over any of the links, a shape with colored lines/arrows appears, adding a lovely splash of color to the page.

The Post Family

Discover the full layout of this ultra-minimalist website. It begins with a black & white screen which showcases a big heading, the menu, and the logo design. Also, you can navigate through the site using your keyboard.

Velvet Hammer

Velvet Hammer’s site demonstrates the value of composition in minimalism. The two dominating visuals are poised symmetrically, all four corners are occupied, the entire scene is framed by a thick black border, and thin lines bisect the vertical and horizontal halves. At the center of the screen – though not the composition – is the brand name. The whole site has the same ultra-minimalist design.

Symbolset

Icon font vendor Symbolset attracts attention to the interactive area in the middle of its site by minimizing the competing elements and adding a brightly colored, ever-changing background. An inspired demonstration of minimalist design.

Huggable.io

This is a real expression of extreme minimalism. The website is, in fact, an app that will tell you when a flight is due to arrive. You enter the airline, then you are asked for the flight number – if that flight number is relevant to more than one flight you will be offered the days of the flight to choose from, then finally you are shown the departure and arrival times – or when your ‘huggable’ time is! This is great if you are waiting at an airport for a delayed flight – as long as the airline actually has some idea of arrival time, you can get the info.

We Ain’t Plastic

We Ain’t Plastic website uses the philosophy “less is more” in a very classic way. Contrast is another useful visual tactic for keeping minimalist designs interesting. German UX engineer Roland Lösslein’s website We Ain’t Plastic sets up a stark contrast in size between the central image and the text and icons above.

Brian Nathan Hartwell

The homepage is dominated by the black background, the only accent being “gold” and white typography. This website is well-organized into a grid layout which includes a certain project. Each one has an amazing animation which comes to life when you hover over.

Carlo Barberis

The Italian jeweler Carlo Barberis takes the advantage of the high-end attributes of ultra minimalism, with little more than a hero image on each screen. As usual, an image speaks more than one thousand words.

Why we explore

Created by the Swiss interaction designer Nicolas Lanthemann, Why We Explore is a blog about space that follows an interesting format. Although the topic is vast, the information is given plenty of space to breathe; each new theme being announced as the viewer scrolls horizontally across the page.

The Office of Jason James

In terms of design, a minimalist approach can say a lot about your website. This is a stunning portfolio website that uses a side menu and a creative clean design. The light gray background accompanies beautifully the dark-gray typography and the stunning pictures, leaving the information room to breathe.

Elite Model

Modelling agency Elite takes the minimalist design to its extreme. In terms of navigation, the focus is on only two main pathways, and all the others tucked away in a hamburger menu. In terms of visual design, the website has the classic black and white color scheme, excepting the “Become a model” section. Another website where the photos speak for themselves.

Werkling Brand Design Agency

For sure, you can express more with less! The Werklig agency knows this! Their website uses a large white background and the classic black and white color scheme for the part that is designated for their presentation. On the other side, for their portfolio, they used a grid layout to showcase each project.

Lunar Gravity

This website includes a neat parallax effect which makes everything come to life, giving another dimension to the entire layout.

Scytale

Scytale is another defining website for the concept of minimalism in web design. They use very large white and light gray background and big and bold typography, helping the user to focus on the main message. The red color used for some flat design and typography are the only color accents used here.

Thrive

Simple design on a subtle grid. Garnished with flat design and simple, bright blue color via scrolling. A fun, clean, good interaction!

Yaron Schoen

You only need a message and a creative way to showcase it to the public. This minimalist website also includes a full-screen menu design which can be accessed from the sticky logo design on the top left.

 

Read More at Top 20 inspiring examples of ultra-minimalist websites

from Web Design Ledger https://webdesignledger.com/top-20-inspiring-examples-of-ultra-minimalist-websites/

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #40

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

For this post, I am going to deviate from my super interesting posts about servers and talk a little about the job that I recently started at Fyresite.

As you all know roughly four weeks ago I started working at Fyresite, as one of their Front-End Developers. And so far I am really enjoying my time there. But I don’t want to talk about how happy I am, and I doubt you really want to read about that.

As there Front-End guy it basically has been a crash course into the Front-End world and just how much I still need to learn to quicken my pace and keep up. I am fairly adequate in low-level languages but with a new job, there is always a learning curve into new technologies and how they go about building out custom sites that sometimes seems over my head.

My first week, I had a full site drop into my lap. 10 plus pages, custom layout with WordPress, with three other developers work compiled onto it. Giving me both a launching point to get up and running and also a lot to sift through to see how they have been going about building this thing out. With this project, I have had to brush up on many different languages and some that I never thought this early on I would be using.

So roughly this posts purpose is not to scare you away in an “I don’t know enough” fashion, as is how I saw it for so long. But once you know some core web fundamentals, it will be easy to use what you know to apply them to whatever projects that come your way.

 

My first project as a paid Front-End Web Developer I have been very accustoming to using HTML, CSS, WordPress platform, Javascript, jQuery, PHP, FTP, SQL, and AJAX. The software I have been using includes Photoshop, Cyberduck, Atom, MAMP, Sequel Pro, Sketch, Insomnia, and the GitHub Desktop app. Like I said it is a lot to take in. Currently we are working on a desktop app that uses SASS, NODE, and React. And again, I am in my fourth week of work. So what does all this mean?

Basically how I see it, is that is that you will never be absolutely ready to enter into the Development world, me included. But like all great developers you have to see yourself as a useful multi tool.

What do you need to and pulling that broad knowledge base you have to find useful solutions to problems. The job of a developer is to fix what is broken, and being the reason is broke in the first place may leave you in a weird spot. But it should not. I walked into this job, knowing only the near sighted fundamentals of many different languages, where Fyresite comes in, is allowing you to use what you have learned and giving you a platform to make solutions and solve a problem.

It is no different than school, or even The Flatiron School. They display a usable solution to a problem that you may encounter. And give you an an example of a situation to solve using the knowledge you have gained. Even though the environment varies, you still have to think about the solution the same way. This is one of the greatest strengths I am able to walk away from The Flatiron School, a stable platform to launch myself off of to solve problems.

Read More at My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #40

from Web Design Ledger https://webdesignledger.com/my-journey-of-learning-programming-through-flatiron-school-40/

Post Less, Boost Top Posts, and More: 14 Ways to Increase Your Facebook Page Engagement

Engagement on Facebook Pages has fallen by 70 percent since the start of 2017, according to BuzzSumo who analyzed over 880 million Facebook posts by brands and publishers.

Buzzsumo study: Falling Facebook Page engagement

As a social media marketer, it is worrying to see these trends.

But we feel there are ways we can combat this organic reach decline on Facebook and we’d love to share some strategies with you.

In this post, we’ll share 14 straightforward ways to increase your Facebook Page engagement — many of which are proven and have worked for us. 

14 Actionable Strategies for Increasing Your Facebook Page Engagement

14 ways to increase your Facebook engagement

Starting a Facebook Page might be easy but with the falling organic reach and engagement, growing a Facebook Page can be challenging.

Here are the 14 tactics you can try today to increase your Facebook Page engagement:

  1. Post less
  2. Post when your fans are online
  3. Create specifically for Facebook
  4. Try videos
  5. Go live
  6. Share curated content
  7. Ask for opinions
  8. Boost your top posts
  9. Recycle your top posts
  10. Watch other Facebook Pages
  11. Experiment with new content
  12. Reply comments
  13. Host giveaways (occasionally)
  14. Create a linked Facebook Group

Let’s dive in!

1. Post less

Posting less grew our reach and engagement by three times.

Average Facebook daily reach visualization

But the main reason for the growth wasn’t just because we were posting less. It’s because posting less allowed us to…

focus on quality instead of quantity.

We were able to share the best content every day when we post only once or twice a day. When we were posting four to five times a day, we struggled to consistently find so much great content to share.

If you are a solo social media manager or a small business owner who handles your own social media, you might have experienced this before. Finding great content takes time, and you don’t always have the time to do that.

That said, if you are able to maintain the quality of your content while posting many times a day, don’t feel that you have to change your strategy. A few of our readers post more than 10 times a day to their Facebook Page and have found great success.

2. Post when your fans are online

We used to believe that there’s a universal best time to post on Facebook: early afternoon.

But not anymore.

We now believe that every brand has its own perfect time(s) to post. That’s because the best time to post depends on several factors that are specific to each brand: What industry are you in? Where is your audience based? When do your followers use Facebook?

A scientific way to find your best time to post is to look at your own data.

In your Facebook Page Insights, under the Post tab, you get data about when your Facebook Page fans are online for each day of the week.

Facebook Page fans data

Using your data, you can make educated guesses of your best posting time. I would recommend experimenting with times during both the peak and non-peak hours to see which works better for your brand.

3. Create specifically for Facebook

What works on Instagram or Twitter might not always work on Facebook. For example, hashtags are great on Instagram and GIFs are great on Twitter but both less so on Facebook.

It’s best to create your Facebook posts specifically for your Facebook Page.

With Buffer, you can easily customize your social media post for each platform when sharing to multiple platforms at once. You can even go one step further by customizing your article headline for your Facebook post.

Tailored posts

If you would like to give this a go, we would love for you to try Buffer for Business and experience the difference.

4. Try videos

If you’re wondering how to craft your Facebook posts, we think you should try videos.

From what we have seen this year, videos perform best on Facebook in terms of reach and engagement.

Facebook post types stats

The BuzzSumo study mentioned above also found that “videos now gain twice the level of engagement of other post formats on average”.

Here are three more tips to help you get the most out of your videos:

5. Go live


Facebook has also been pushing their Live videos a lot in this past year.

They tweaked their algorithm to rank live videos higher when they are live than when they are no longer live. Facebook reported that “People spend more than 3x more time watching a Facebook Live video on average compared to a video that’s no longer live” and “people comment more than 10 times more on Facebook Live videos than on regular videos”.

For our #impactofsocial celebration, we hosted five Facebook Live sessions, which received about 4,000 views and 30 comments on average.

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fvideos%2F1596144793791295%2F&show_text=1&width=560

Here’s a bonus: Your followers might be more likely to check out your content.

Social Media Examiner noticed that when they went live more often, their non-live content received more exposure. Their founder and CEO, Michael Stelzner, believes that when they go live, their fans are exposed to their brand even if they don’t watch the live video. That might have subtly encouraged them to check out Social Media Examiner’s Facebook Page.

To help you get started with Facebook Live videos, here are some ideas you can try:

  • Share behind-the-scenes of an event, your work processes, or your office
  • Host a Question-and-Answer or Ask-Me-Anything session
  • Interview industry experts using a software like BeLive
  • Explain or demonstrate how to do something
  • Discuss breaking news
  • Share weekly tips

6. Share curated content


It might feel weird sharing other brands’ content. That’s how we felt initially. But after experimenting with sharing high-quality curated content, the results changed our mind.

By sharing top-performing posts from sites like TechcrunchInc., and Quartz, we were able to reach a much bigger audience. For example, our recent 10 curated content reached 113,000 people on average.

We had less than 100,000 Facebook Page Likes until recently.

This helped us grow our Facebook Page, allowing us to share our own content with more people. Since the start of this year, our Facebook Page Likes have grown from about 79,000 to 100,000.

Facebook Page growth

There are two types of curated content you can share:

  • Third-party content from other brands
  • User-generated content from your customers

We mostly share content from other brands on our Facebook Page as that type of content resonates with our Facebook Page followers. Once in a while, we also share user-generated content from our community (which works amazingly on our Instagram account) on our Facebook Page. They tend to perform well, too.

Curated content

7. Ask for opinions

It might be obvious that people comment when they have something to say. But sometimes, we don’t offer them a chance to say anything!

Asking questions is a good way to offer our followers a chance to share their thoughts.

A practice I like is to share relevant news or blog post and ask our followers for their opinions. What to share might vary depending on your audience. If you have a professional audience, you might want to share industry news or articles. If you are a lifestyle brand, you might choose to share lifestyle news instead.

Here’s a recent example where we asked our followers for their thoughts on a thought-leadership blog post:

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fposts%2F1624345454304562&width=500

8. Boost your top posts

If you have a budget for Facebook advertising, consider boosting your top-performing posts. Your top-performing posts are proven content — content that is proven to engage your audience. This makes them suitable for a boost. With the right ad targeting, these posts would continue to engage more people, reach even more people.

And you don’t need a lot of money for this.

With a $40 daily budget, our boosted posts get up to roughly four times more paid reach than organic reach. As reach increased, engagement on the posts also went up.

Here are some recent examples:

Boosted post examples

9. Recycle your top posts

Besides boosting your top posts, you can also recycle them.

This will help you get more value out of your content. When you re-post a piece of high-quality content, it can often generate as much reach and engagement as the original post (sometimes, more) — essentially doubling the value of that content.

For example, we first posted a blog post as a link with a list as the caption.

Original post

As our followers loved it, we (boosted it and) re-posted it with a video. This time, it reached almost twice as many people and generated a little more engagement, with roughly the same ad spend.

Repost with video

Instead of reposting the top-performing post as it is, change the post a little. There are several ways you can make it look fresh again:

  • Add a video
  • Add an image
  • Ask a question

Generally, for Facebook, you would want to wait several weeks before reposting the same post if you are posting only once or two a day. This will prevent your followers from seeing the same post too often and getting bored of your Facebook posts.

10. Watch other Facebook Pages

The social media landscape is ever-changing. What’s working today might not work tomorrow. It can be helpful to learn from other Facebook Pages and see what has been working for them.

Facebook provides an excellent feature for this: Pages to Watch.

Facebook Pages to Watch feature

Pages to Watch allows you to compare the performance of your Facebook Page and posts with similar Pages at a glance. You can also easily check out each Page’s top posts by clicking on their Page name.

To access Pages to Watch, go to your Facebook Page Insights and scroll down to the bottom of the Overview tab.

11. Experiment with new content

Another way to keep up with the ever-changing social media landscape is to constantly experiment with new content.

Just a while back, images were the best type of content to drive engagement. Now, videos are taking the lead. Brands who started on video early before it became the norm were able to benefit from the trend the most.

Testing new types of content keeps you at the edge of the latest trends.

A technique we like to use was inspired by Coca-Cola’s 70/20/10 marketing budget rule.

Coca-Cola 70/20/10 rule

You can use this rule in many ways. Here’s how I like to think of it when it comes to testing new Facebook content:

  • 70 percent of your content should be the types of content that are already performing well now, such as videos and images.
  • 20 percent of your content should be iterations and improvements of your 70 percent, such as new types of videos.
  • 10 percent of your content should be experimental content, which might become the next big thing.

12. Reply comments


If you want your followers to engage with your Facebook posts, here’s something simple to try when they comment: reply to all their comments.

This would make them feel heard and be more willing to comment on your Facebook posts in the future.

There’s a psychological explanation for this, too. Moira Burke, who studied 1,200 Facebook users, found that personalized messages are more satisfying to the receiver than a simple Like.

Something we do at Buffer is to sign off each reply with our first name. This adds a personal touch to our replies. I like to think that many of our followers know that when they comment on our posts, they will be chatting with someone from Buffer and not simply commenting on a brand’s post.

Replies on our Facebook post

We use Buffer Reply to reply our followers on Facebook (and also Twitter and Instagram). Having all the comments in one single place makes it more efficient as we don’t have to jump from post to post.

Buffer Reply

13. Host giveaways (occasionally)

Our contest and giveaway posts generally get the most amount of engagement.

Here’s an example from last year:

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fposts%2F1305818576157253%3A0&width=500

There are two things we keep in mind while hosting such giveaways:

  • We do them only once in a while. Having giveaways regularly can sometimes annoy your followers (unless that’s the main objective of your Facebook Page). I would recommend leaving a few weeks or months between each one.
  • We give relevant gifts. Most of the time, our prize is our Buffer swag. That’s because we know that many of our followers would love to get a Buffer swag (and we are thankful for that) and they are the exact audience we want to engage with.

14. Create a linked Facebook Group


Finally, a potential resolution to the falling organic reach and engagement on Facebook is to start a Facebook Group and link it to your Facebook Page.

Linked Facebook Group

A Facebook Group with your most engaged followers would likely generate more discussions than your Facebook Page. My hunch is that the discussions in your Facebook Group will benefit your Facebook Page in several ways:

  • More awareness: As your members engage with one another in your Facebook Group, they likely have your brand at the top of their mind. You can also post and comment with your Facebook Page. All these might encourage your members to check out your Facebook Page, like live videos did for Social Media Examiner.
  • Facebook algorithm boost: This is purely a guess. Since your Facebook Group is linked to your Facebook Page, engagement in your Facebook Group might influence how your Facebook Page posts rank on your members’ News Feed.

If you are considering starting a Facebook Group, here’s our complete guide to starting and managing a Facebook Group.

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What have you been trying on Facebook?

If driving engagement on your Facebook Page has been challenging for you, I hope you’ve found one or two (or 14) tactics that might be useful to you.

One thing I would keep in mind when using these tactics is that it might take a while for the results to show. It took us some time to figure out what works for our Facebook Page. Don’t be disheartened if you don’t see an increase in engagement immediately.

Okay, that’s enough from me. I would love to hear about your Facebook Page strategy. What are some tactics you have tried and have been working (or not) for you? What are some of the tactics you would like to try going forward?

(If you liked this blog post, you might also like our blog post on the Facebook marketing tips that we had tested.)

Image credit: Unsplash

from Social https://blog.bufferapp.com/increase-facebook-page-engagement